Category Archives: Digital Rhetoric

Digital Rhetoric Project Proposal: “Teenage Mutants”

My proposed project, tentatively titled “Teenage Mutants: The Digital Hauntings of Unfriended (2014) and Poppy,” will focus on the gothic representations (and subversions) of gender and nostalgia through digital hauntings. This sort of analysis is important because it helps to … Continue reading

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The “Social ePortfolio” for Learners and Educators

Although I had heard of ePortfolios before completing the reading for my Digital Rhetoric course this week, I had never really thought about them before, or seen one in action. I suppose this blog (and the other ones produced and … Continue reading

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Russ Castronovo’s “The ‘Black Arts’ of Citizenship” and Posthuman Gothic

This is the time of the semester where I suddenly want to combine texts I’ve read for my different classes into a single project. The reading this week for my American Gothic independent study centered around Harriet Jacobs’s Incidents in the … Continue reading

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Viral Nostalgia in Levan Gabriadze’s Unfriended (2014)

One of the readings for my Digital Rhetorics class this week, William C. Kurlinkus’s “Memorial Interactivity: Scaffolding User Experiences,” deals partly with the concept of viral nostalgia. After some deliberation, I decided that my blog post would connect Kurlinkus’s viral … Continue reading

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The Avatar Nightmare: Body Horror and Digital Identity

Knowing that this week was centered on avatar and gaming literacies, I had assumed that I would focus my blog post on some of my favorite horror video games. However, while I was attending the Ann Radcliffe Academic Conference (housed … Continue reading

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Heels, Faces, and Cyborgs: Cyberfeminism and the WWE

Female and POC wrestling fans often find themselves in the bizarre (yet common to many fandoms) position of simultaneously being both outsiders and insiders of the community. We learn the lingo, the characters, and the history, yet we are often … Continue reading

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Rules and Narrative

In his article “Narration, Intrigue, and Reader Positioning in Electronic Narratives,” Daniel Punday introduces readers to Espen J. Aarseth’s definition of “intrigue”: “a sequence of oscillating activities effectuated (but not controlled) by the user” (25-26). Although these are actions taken … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Rhetoric, Film, Video Games | 3 Comments

‘Feed me a stray cat’: Meme Magic and Worshipping Donald Trump

When this semester began, I noticed (with great delight) an article about “meme magic” listed on my Digital Rhetoric course’s syllabus. Since last Spring, Bret Easton Ellis’s controversial 1991 novel American Psycho (and, to a slightly lesser extent, the film of the … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Rhetoric, Horror | 3 Comments

Katherine N. Hayles’s Virtual Bodies and Black Mirror’s “USS Callister”

In an effort to physicalize Katherine N. Hayles’s abstracted theories regarding the posthuman and virtuality, I’d like to closely examine one of the episodes from the most recent season of Black Mirror, “U.S.S. Callister” against Hayles’s How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies … Continue reading

Posted in Digital Rhetoric, Horror, Television | Tagged , , | 11 Comments

Immediacy and Adam Ellis’s Digital Ghost Story

Creators of horror fiction have always been interested in finding and using new methods to create the sense of unrelenting immediacy for their readers and/or viewers. As one of the primary goals of gothic and horror texts 1 is to … Continue reading

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